Kybella

Kybella® is an FDA-approved injectable treatment for double chin or chin fat removal, thereby improving your profile.

How does Kybella work ?

Kybella works by killing fat cells with a synthetic form of an acid found in our gastrointestinal tract. It’s optimal for targeting fat cells in small areas, such as the chin. Keep in mind that most patients need up to six Kybella treatments, six to eight weeks apart. So you may not start seeing the results you want for several months.

The active ingredient in Kybella® is synthetic deoxycholic acid. Deoxycholic acid is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that aids in the breakdown and absorption of dietary fat. When injected into the fat beneath the chin,Kybella®destroys fat cells, resulting in a noticeable reduction in fullness under the chin. Once destroyed, these cells can no longer store or accumulate fat, so further treatment is not expected once you reach your desired aesthetic goal.

 

Adra, age 36, before and After 3 treatments.

 

What can Kybella treat ?

Used to treat double chins – when injected into chin fat,Kybella destroys fat cells, resulting in a noticeable reduction in fullness under the chin.

What is a Kybella session like ?

Before starting treatment, your healthcare specialist will examine the area under and around your chin to determine if Kybella® is right for you.

During your appointment, your doctor will draw some lines on the injection site as a guide. Depending on how much chin fullness you have, you may get anywhere from 20–50 small, quick injections in the area.

Most patients report a slight burning sensation after each injection that can last a few minutes. Please consult with your dermatologist, if you have a low pain tolerance or have any concerns.

Right after your appointment, you should be able to drive home or go to work the same day but may want to avoid strenuous activity for a few days until any swelling subsides.

What results can be expected from Kybella ?

Once fat cells are destroyed, they’re gone and won’t be replaced. Should you gain additional weight however, the existing surrounding fat cells will expand and you will require additional treatments.

You should start seeing visible results 5-6 weeks after treatment.

 

 

Acne Treatment

Acne Treatment

Acne affects over 
50 million 
people in the U.S. annually. 
 
Breakouts peak at 
14-17 years 
of age. 
 
Minor acne affects 
85% of people 
between the ages of 12 and 24. 
 
Acne-prone pores shed 
5 layers 
of skin cells daily. 
 

What Is Acne?

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), acne is the most common skin disorder, and it affects up to 50 million people in the United States each year. Most people develop acne symptoms as teenagers, but it can also develop in adulthood. The AAD estimates that 85% of people between the ages of 12 and 24 have at least minor acne.

But what exactly is acne? It’s an inflammatory skin condition that affects the skin’s hair follicles and oil glands. The acne symptoms you develop are determined by the type of acne you have, and it can form on many areas of the body, including your face, neck, chest, back, and shoulders. Some people may have only mild whiteheads or blackheads, but others may develop large, painful lumps that form deep under the skin.

An Everyday Guide to Acne

What Are the Types of Acne?

The two types of acne are non-inflammatory and inflammatory. These two categories contain six different subtypes of acne: whiteheads, blackheads, papules, pustules, cysts, and nodules. Whiteheads and blackheads are types of non-inflammatory acne, while papules, pustules, cysts, and nodules are inflammatory types of acne. It’s common for people to have multiple types of acne at the same time. Let’s take a closer look at each subtype of acne and the acne symptoms they cause:


Non-inflammatory Acne


Whiteheads: 
Whiteheads are also called closed comedones, and they form when pores are clogged by dead skin cells and oil. They’re closed at the surface of the skin and appear as a small white bump. Since whiteheads can’t be removed by squeezing them, you shouldn’t try to pop them. Trying to squeeze a whitehead can damage your skin, possibly leading to scarring.

Blackheads: Blackheads are known as open comedones because the top of the pore stays open. Since the rest of the pore is clogged, blackheads appear as small black dots at the surface of the skin. Just like whiteheads, blackheads develop when pores are clogged with oil and dead skin cells. Although you can remove a blackhead by squeezing it, this isn’t recommended by dermatologists because it can cause scarring.

Inflammatory Acne

Papules: Papules appear as small red bumps on the skin that are very tender to the touch. They occur when comedones become inflamed and bacteria, oil, and dead skin cells get trapped under the surface of the skin. It’s common for papules to cluster together, creating an appearance that looks similar to a rash. You should never try to squeeze papules because it can worsen the inflammation and cause scarring.

Pustules: Pustules are very similar in appearance to papules, but the primary difference between the two is that pustules contain pus. This results in a bulging bump at the surface of the skin that is white or yellow in appearance. Only your dermatologist can drain pustules. Attempting to squeeze pustules can lead to dark spots on the skin and cause the bacteria to spread.

Nodules: Nodules develop deep within the skin and are usually quite painful. They appear as large, hard bumps that feel firm when you touch them. Nodules form when bacteria travel deep into the pore and cause an infection.

Cysts: Cysts are considered severe acne, and they appear as large, red lesions that are filled with pus. Cysts are similar in appearance to boils and are often very painful. They develop when there is an infection deep under the skin, and they also have the largest risk of permanent scarring compared with other types of acne.

What Are the Types of Acne?

The two types of acne are non-inflammatory and inflammatory. These two categories contain six different subtypes of acne: whiteheads, blackheads, papules, pustules, cysts, and nodules. Whiteheads and blackheads are types of non-inflammatory acne, while papules, pustules, cysts, and nodules are inflammatory types of acne. It’s common for people to have multiple types of acne at the same time. Let’s take a closer look at each subtype of acne and the acne symptoms they cause:

 

Non-inflammatory Acne

Whiteheads are also called closed comedones, and they form when pores are clogged by dead skin cells and oil. They’re closed at the surface of the skin and appear as a small white bump. Since whiteheads can’t be removed by squeezing them, you shouldn’t try to pop them. Trying to squeeze a whitehead can damage your skin, possibly leading to scarring.

Blackheads are known as open comedones because the top of the pore stays open. Since the rest of the pore is clogged, blackheads appear as small black dots at the surface of the skin. Just like whiteheads, blackheads develop when pores are clogged with oil and dead skin cells. Although you can remove a blackhead by squeezing it, this isn’t recommended by dermatologists because it can cause scarring.

Inflammatory Acne

Papules appear as small red bumps on the skin that are very tender to the touch. They occur when comedones become inflamed and bacteria, oil, and dead skin cells get trapped under the surface of the skin. It’s common for papules to cluster together, creating an appearance that looks similar to a rash. You should never try to squeeze papules because it can worsen the inflammation and cause scarring.

Pustules are very similar in appearance to papules, but the primary difference between the two is that pustules contain pus. This results in a bulging bump at the surface of the skin that is white or yellow in appearance. Only your dermatologist can drain pustules. Attempting to squeeze pustules can lead to dark spots on the skin and cause the bacteria to spread.

Nodules develop deep within the skin and are usually quite painful. They appear as large, hard bumps that feel firm when you touch them. Nodules form when bacteria travel deep into the pore and cause an infection.

Cysts are considered severe acne, and they appear as large, red lesions that are filled with pus. Cysts are similar in appearance to boils and are often very painful. They develop when there is an infection deep under the skin, and they also have the largest risk of permanent scarring compared with other types of acne.

How Is Acne Treated?

Acne treatment varies for each person and depends on the type of acne you have and its severity. If you have whiteheads or blackheads, your dermatologist may recommend products containing salicylic acid or topical retinoids derived from vitamin A, such as tretinoin (Retin-A) or adapalene (Differin). Treatments containing these ingredients work by exfoliating the skin and encouraging cell turnover, removing dead skin cells before they can clog your pores. If you have multiple whiteheads in one spot, you can also use an acne spot treatment containing benzoyl peroxide.

If you have pimples and blemishes, your dermatologist may recommend products containing benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid for acne treatment. These products are usually applied to your entire face, although some are designed for acne spot treatment. In addition to fighting inflammation and controlling oil production, products with these ingredients can treat existing acne and prevent new blemishes from forming.

For larger pustules and papules, your dermatologist will likely prescribe an acne medication, such as an oral antibiotic, to treat bacteria and soothe inflammation.

Woman checking her skin condition

This is especially helpful if you have acne on other parts of your body, such as your back, chest, or neck, since widespread acne is easier to treat with prescription medication. Products containing benzoyl peroxide can also be an effective acne treatment for pustules and papules.

Severe acne, such as nodules and cysts, can only be treated by a dermatologist and a prescription acne medication. Many dermatologists prescribe isotretinoin for people who have nodules and cysts. This is an oral retinoid that inhibits the growth of bacteria, reduces oil products, and soothes inflamed skin, helping it heal.

Since hormones also play a role in the development of acne, especially for women, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to control and treat acne. Research has shown that birth control pills are just as effective as oral antibiotics for treating acne in women.

Skin Care Tips for Managing and Preventing Acne

Make sure to wash your face every morning and night using a mild cleanser recommended by your dermatologist.

Avoid using harsh scrubs or astringents, which can irritate and dry out your skin, causing your acne to worsen.

Washing your face no more than twice each day can help remove oil, sweat, and debris that can clog your pores and promote acne development.

In addition to increasing your risk of skin cancer, the sun also can aggravate acne. Be sure to protect your skin from the sun and apply an oil-free sunscreen every day. This is especially important, since some acne treatments make your skin more susceptible to damage from the sun.

Make sure you’re consistently using your prescription or over-the-counter treatments. According to the AAD, it can take four to six weeks before you start seeing signs of improvement from topical treatments. Applying topical treatments consistently is crucial to treating and preventing acne.

In addition to increasing your risk of skin cancer, the sun also can aggravate acne. Be sure to protect your skin from the sun and apply an oil-free sunscreen every day. This is especially important, since some acne treatments make your skin more susceptible to damage from the sun.

Make sure you’re consistently using your prescription or over-the-counter treatments. According to the AAD, it can take four to six weeks before you start seeing signs of improvement from topical treatments. Applying topical treatments consistently is crucial to treating and preventing acne.

Booking an appointment has never been easier.

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Shingles

What are Shingles?

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection that can occur anywhere on the body in the form of a line of blisters on the torso. Shingles is usually painful and also contagious. The cause of shingles is believed to be the varicella-zoster virus, which also causes chickenpox. Anyone who has had chickenpox also has the varicella-zoster virus, which remains dormant except for its outbreak as shingles.

Someone who has contracted shingles can transmit the virus to anyone who is not immune to chickenpox; that is, anyone who has not had a vaccination. In those people, the virus is spread through direct contact with the shingles. Interestingly, the direct contact results in chickenpox, but not shingles.

What are the symptoms of Shingles?

Shingles is usually localized around the trunk of the body and presents itself as a very painful red rash accompanied by numbness and/or a tingling sensation.

Other symptoms include:

  • Headaches
  • Fever and/or chills
  • Fatigue
  • Fluid-filled blisters
  • Severe itching

Who can get Shingles?

Those who are at greater risk for shingles are:

  • People over age 50
  • People with compromised immune systems (due to life-threatening illnesses such as cancer or leukemia)
  • People who are not immune to chickenpox

Treatment options for Shingles

The best defense against shingles is the chickenpox vaccine. Once shingles has appeared, however, treatment options include:

  • Prescription antiviral drugs such as acyclovir (Zovirax), valacyclovir (Valtrex), and famciclovir (Famvir)
  • Numbing creams or sprays
  • Anticonvulsants
  • Antidepressants

Cysts

What are Cysts?

A cyst is a broad term for a fluid or semi-fluid filled sac that occurs within skin tissue and can appear anywhere on the body. Some cysts are microscopic, while others, if left untreated, can grow so large that they interfere with the function of internal organs.

Cysts develop a wall, unlike an abscess, which is also filled with fluid, but does not have a wall surrounding it. There are hundreds of types of cysts, many earning their name because of their location. These include ovarian cysts, pancreatic cysts, and pericardial cysts.

Although most cysts are benign and respond favorably to treatment, some cysts may be tumors and could be malignant. Among the malignant cyst candidates are keratocysts and dermoid cysts. Keratocysts occur in the back of the jaw. Dermoid cysts are slow-growing cysts that are often composed of skin, hair follicles, sebum, fat, blood and other body materials. In the rare cases that a dermoid cyst becomes malignant, it usually develops into squamous cell carcinoma in adults.

What causes Cysts?

Symptoms of cysts include finding an abnormal lump on the surface or just below the skin. They are closed pockets of tissue that can be filled with fluid, pus or other material. Skin cysts are usually slow-growing, painless and smooth to the touch when they are rolled under the skin. Cysts can appear anywhere, but generally appear on the face, neck, trunk and genital area. Cysts can also develop in the body at or near internal organs. In these cases, benign cysts can be undetected but are not problematic until they interfere with a body function. A lump that may be a cyst should be examined by a dermatologist.

Who gets Cysts?

Anyone of any race or either gender may develop a cyst at any time; however, there are certain factors that make some people more susceptible than others. These include:

  • Post puberty
  • Male
  • History of acne
  • Significant sun exposure
  • Previous skin injuries

What can treat Cysts?

Cysts can be effectively removed but the treatment protocol for removal depends largely on the location and cause of the cyst. Typically, visible cysts are treated through drainage or surgical removal.

Drainage – In most cases, fluid of the cyst can be drained by inserting needles into the cyst cavity, resulting in collapse of the cyst.

Surgery – If there is a suspicion of cancer, the cyst is generally removed by surgery or a biopsy is performed to rule out malignancy. Cysts that are very large and result in symptoms due to their size may also be candidates for surgical removal.

When a cyst is not visible, that is, when it is organ-centered or located elsewhere deep in the body, the options for treatment include:

Watch and wait – This process involves routine medical imaging of the cyst(s) to monitor their growth.

Biopsy – If there is a suspicion that the cyst is cancerous, a biopsy may be in order, depending on the location of the cyst.

Age Spots

What are Age Spots?

Age spots, also commonly known as liver spots, range in size and in color from light brown to black and appear on the skin where it is frequently exposed to the sun. Despite their name, age spots are not caused by age or liver dysfunction, except that the longer you live, the more likely they are to occur.

What do Age Spots look like?

Age spots appear most often where the skin is repeatedly exposed to the sun, such as the face, hands, neck, exposed scalp, and arms. Age spots can mimic cancerous growth but in nearly all cases, they are harmless beyond any self-conscious reaction to their appearance.

Who causes Age Spots ?

Age spots are more likely to appear on people whose lifestyle exposes them to the sun. Over time, the skin loses its ability to regenerate after sun exposure and the spots appear. The best way to avoid age spots is to keep the skin from becoming overexposed to the sun by covering it with clothing or using a sunscreen with an appropriate SPF.

What can treat Age Spots?

There is no medical need to treat age spots.

Warts

Warts

With a strong immune system,
70% of people
get rid of warts
There’s a greater chance
to get warts,
if family member has it
Warts can take about
2-6 months
to develop
Wart’s black dots are
blood vessels
that can lead to bleeding

What Are Warts?

Warts are raised, skin-colored growths that can develop almost anywhere on the body and may resemble a cauliflower or solid blister. Most warts are completely harmless, but people often consider wart removal for a variety of reasons, including embarrassment and wanting to avoid spreading them to others.

What Causes Warts?

A group of viruses called the human papillomavirus (HPV) causes warts. When your skin is infected with one of the viruses in the HPV family, it triggers the excessive growth of skin cells. This makes the outer layer of your skin appear thickened and hard in that specific area.

Who Gets Warts?

Warts are highly contagious and spread easily from person to person. It’s possible to get warts simply by touching a wart on another person’s body. You can even get warts from touching a surface or object that’s been in contact with a wart, including towels.

Anyone at any age can get warts, but children and teens are more likely to develop them. If you have a weakened immune system, you’re at a higher risk of developing warts. If you have any cuts or scrapes on your skin, it’s easy for the HPV virus to enter.  This also explains why people who bite their nails or pick at hangnails are susceptible to warts.

 

Types of Warts

There are several types of warts, and our Forefront dermatologists determine the type of wart you have based on its appearance and where it appears on your body. Here’s a closer look at some of the different types of warts.

Common wart: This type of wart is usually small and feels like a rough bump. They’re most often found on the fingers, the backs of hands, and the skin around your nails. A common wart is typically flesh-colored, but it can also have black dots that look similar in appearance to seeds. These are actually tiny blood clots, which can lead to bleeding.

Flat wart: Flat warts are typically smoother in appearance and smaller in comparison to other types, although they tend to grow in large numbers. It’s not uncommon to have 20–100 flat warts at a time. These warts are commonly found on women’s legs, children’s faces, and men’s beard areas.

Plantar wart: Plantar warts develop on the soles of your feet. They are flat in appearance and grow into your skin due to the pressure from walking and standing. This inward growth can make it feel like you have pebbles in your shoe. Like common warts, plantar warts can also have black dots, and they usually grow in clusters.

Filiform wart: These warts often grow quickly and typically develop around your mouth, eyes, and nose. Filiform warts have a spiky or thread-like appearance.

Periungual wart: Periungual warts develop under or around the fingernails and toenails. Although they start out small, they can grow to become a rough bump.

Treatment Options for Wart Removal

Most warts will go away without resorting to wart removal methods. This is especially true for children, but it can be more difficult for warts to disappear in adults. Without wart treatment, it can take between one to five years for them to go away.

If you have numerous warts, if a wart hurts, or if you can’t get rid of a wart on your own, you should see your Browsboro dermatologist who will recommend the best wart removal method for you. Treatment depends on the type of wart you have and its location on your body. Our highly skilled Board-Certified dermatologists offer many treatment options for warts.

 

Wart on a child's hand

These are some of the best wart removal options recommended by our dermatologists:

Cryotherapy is one of the most common wart treatment options. This treatment freezes off the wart with liquid nitrogen, but more than one treatment is usually needed.

Excision: Your dermatologist will cut the wart out of your skin.

Electrosurgery: This option involves burning the wart with an electric charge delivered through a laser or the top of a needle.

Curettage: Your dermatologist scrapes off the wart with a small tool shaped like a spoon or a sharp knife.

Cantharidin: This is a liquid treatment that’s applied over a wart, causing a blister to form underneath. After the blister dries, which takes about a week, your dermatologist can clip away the wart.

Laser treatment involves burning off the wart with a laser.

Chemical peels: An effective treatment for flat warts, a chemical peel involves applying a peeling medication to the skin, which gently removes warts from the top layer of skin.

Antigen shots boost your immune system, which helps your body fight the virus that causes warts.

Photodynamic therapy uses wavelengths of blue light and medications called photosensitizing agents to destroy warts.

Liquids, gels, and pads containing salicylic acid work by gently exfoliating skin cells until the wart gradually disappears.

Duct tape: This home remedy for warts involves covering the wart in duct tape. By changing the tape every few days, it’s possible to remove some of the wart’s layers.

Booking an appointment has never been easier.

Available Online 24/7.

Skin Allergies

What is Contact Dermatitis?

Contact dermatitis is a red, itchy rash caused by direct contact with a substance or an allergic reaction to it. The rash isn’t contagious or life-threatening, but it can be very uncomfortable.

Many substances can cause such reactions, including soaps, cosmetics, fragrances, jewelry and plants.

To treat contact dermatitis successfully, you need to identify and avoid the cause of your reaction. If you can avoid the offending substance, the rash usually clears up in two to four weeks. You can try soothing your skin with cool, wet compresses, anti-itch creams and other self-care steps.

What are the symptoms of Contact Dermatitis?

Contact dermatitis usually occurs on areas of your body that have been directly exposed to the reaction-causing substance — for example, along a calf that brushed against poison ivy or under a watchband. The rash usually develops within minutes to hours of exposure and can last two to four weeks.

Signs and symptoms of contact dermatitis include:

  • A red rash
  • Itching, which may be severe
  • Dry, cracked, scaly skin
  • Bumps and blisters, sometimes with oozing and crusting
  • Swelling, burning or tenderness

What are the treatment options for Contact Dermatitis?

When to see a doctor

See your doctor if:

  • The rash is so uncomfortable that you are losing sleep or are distracted from your daily activities
  • The rash is sudden, painful, severe or widespread
  • You’re embarrassed by the way your skin looks
  • The rash doesn’t get better within three weeks
  • The rash affects your face or genitals

Seek immediate medical care in the following situations:

  • You think your skin is infected. Clues include fever and pus oozing from blisters.
  • Your lungs, eyes or nasal passages are painful and inflamed, perhaps from inhaling an allergen.
  • You think the rash has damaged the mucous lining of your mouth and digestive tract.

Rosacea

Rosacea

In the US, approximately
16 million people
suffer from Rosacea
Rosacea
can be treated
but cannot be cured
There are
4 types
of Rosacea
Rosacea is more common
in fair skinned
individuals

What is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a chronic skin condition that typically affects the face and sometimes the eyes. It’s common to mistake this inflammatory skin problem as acne, an allergic reaction, or eczema because of the redness and acne-like bumps it causes on the skin.

What Does Rosacea Skin Look Like?

  • Persistent skin redness
  • Facial swelling
  • Dry and flaky skin
  • Visible broken blood vessels
  • Sensitive skin
  • Enlarged nose
  • Red, irritated eyes

Are There Different Rosacea Types?

There are four Rosacea types. Let’s take a closer look at each:

Erythematotelangiectatic: With this type of rosacea, you’ll see tiny broken blood vessels on your skin. You’ll notice flushing and redness in the center of your face, and your skin may feel rough, scaly, and dry. Your skin may also sting, burn, and appear swollen.

Papulopustular: This subtype primarily affects middle-aged women. If you have this type, you’ll have oily skin with acne-like bumps that may be filled with pus. Your skin may be very sensitive and burn or sting. Raised patches of skin called plaques may also appear, along with visibly broken blood vessels.

Phymatous: The phymatous type is very rare. When it does occur, you’ll typically have the symptoms of another subtype first. Your skin may have a bumpy texture, and it may start to thicken around your nose, forehead, chin, cheeks, and ears. Your skin will appear oily with large pores. Visibly broken blood vessels will also develop on your skin.

Ocular: This type affects your eyes, causing them to appear watery and bloodshot. Your eyes may feel gritty, creating a feeling like there’s sand in them. They can sting, itch, burn, and feel very dry. Your eyes will be sensitive to the light, and you may not see as well as you did previously. You’re likely to experience blurry vision, and you might have a cyst on your eyelid, along with visibly broken blood vessels.

Before and After

What Are Rosacea Treatment Options?

There isn’t a cure for this skin condition, but there are rosacea treatment options that can help you successfully manage your symptoms and ease your discomfort. Your Forefront dermatologist will work with you to design a treatment plan to address the specific type you have, which may include topical medications, oral antibiotics, light therapy, or laser therapy.

Prescription skin creams can reduce redness, inflammation, and acne-like breakouts. Oral antibiotics can ease swelling, reduce redness, and improve acne-like bumps. According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), most people notice a significant reduction in acne-like breakouts after taking oral antibiotics for one month.

Light therapy, such as photodynamic therapy, may also be a treatment option for some patients. This treatment option can also treat acne-like bumps and redness, but it’s not effective for everyone.

Understanding what triggers your symptoms and following a skincare routine are also important aspects of rosacea treatment. Keeping a journal of the foods that you eat can help you identify potential triggers that make your symptoms worse. Wearing sunscreen and avoiding harsh products that irritate your skin can also prevent flare-ups.

 

Our Board-Certified Forefront dermatologists will create a customized treatment plan and can help to improve the appearance of your skin and manage your symptoms.

Booking an appointment has never been easier.

Available Online 24/7.

Psoriasis

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a non-contagious skin condition caused by an abnormality in the immune system which causes the increased production of new skin cells. Unable to shed the old skin cells quickly enough, the patient’s skin accumulates these dead cells on the skin’s surface.

What are the types of Psoriasis?

Psoriasis has no cure and its cause has not been scientifically determined. The types of psoriasis include:

  • Plaque psoriasis – The most common form of the disease. Presents itself as small, red bumps.
  • Guttate psoriasis – This is the most common type of psoriasis diagnosed in children. Also has small, red bumps.
  • Pustular psoriasis – These are blistered, pus-filled lesions surrounded by reddened skin.
  • Inverse psoriasis – Occurs in the areas of the body where the skin folds, such as the armpits and groin. Appears as smooth, inflamed lesions.
  • Erythrodermic psoriasis – can lead to severe illness or death through the development of a weakened immune system.
  • Psoriatic arthritis – Characterized by joint discomfort that includes pain, swelling, stiffness and/or throbbing.

What does Psoriasis look like?

Common symptoms of psoriasis include:

  • Red, inflamed patches of skin
  • Silvery scales
  • Dry, cracked skin
  • Itching, burning or soreness of the skin
  • Swollen and stiff joints (psoriatic arthritis)

Who gets Psoriasis?

  • 4.5 million Americans annually
  • Slightly more common in women
  • One-third of all children
  • Fair-skinned people report slightly more cases

Psoriasis treatment options?

For adults with mild psoriasis, topical steroids are often prescribed.

Other treatments include:

  • Carefully measured, daily exposure to natural sunlight
  • Oatmeal baths to relieve itching
  • UVB therapy (moderate cases)
  • Immune system suppressants (severe cases)